Nhs social policy essay

The welfare state The idea of the "welfare state" means different things in different countries. The "welfare state" often refers to an ideal model of provision, where the state accepts responsibility for the provision of comprehensive and universal welfare for its citizens. Some commentators use it to mean nothing more than "welfare provided by the state".

Nhs social policy essay

The welfare state The idea of the "welfare state" means different things in different countries. The "welfare state" often refers to an ideal model of provision, where the state accepts responsibility for the provision of comprehensive and universal welfare for its citizens.

Some commentators use it to mean nothing more than "welfare provided by the state". This is the main use in the USA. In many "welfare states", notably those in Western Europe and Scandinavia, social protection is not delivered only by the state, but by a combination of government, independent, voluntary, and autonomous public services.

The "welfare state" in these countries is then a system of social protection rather than a scheme operated by government. This section of the website is mainly concerned with the provision of welfare in different countries.

If you would like to read more on the idea of the "welfare state", including arguments for and against welfare provision, you should begin with the section on social policy. Comparing welfare states Deborah Mitchell [1] identifies five main approaches to the comparison of welfare systems: Comparison of policy, comparing the explicit terms in which actions are taken.

Nhs social policy essay

Flora and Heidenheimer review the historical development of welfare in Europe and America. They find that welfare in different countries often develops on similar lines. Inputs are the resources which go into welfare provision.

For example, Wilensky's work on welfare spending shows that the main determinants are the age of the system and the structure of the population. Different states operate different kinds of rules and structures. Esping-Andersen uses evidence on the organisation and delivery of specific services to define positions adopted by different welfare states.

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This is done by considering the detailed operation of benefits and services - what they do, how they are paid for, and how they work. The Commonwealth Fund compares health care systems on the basis of access, equity, adminstrative efficiency, the care process and health outcomes.

The case can be made that what matters about welfare is not what is intended, nor what the process is, but whether or not people benefit from it. This is the basis of the work done by the Luxembourg Income Study in assessing and comparing social security systems in different countries.

These were a guarantee of minimum standards, including a minimum income; social protection in the event of insecurity; and the provision of services at the best level possible. In practice, social welfare in the United Kingdom is very different from this ideal.

Coverage is extensive, but benefits and services are delivered at a low level. The social protection provided is patchy, and services are tightly rationed. The post-war German settlement was based on the idea of a 'social state', sometimes rendered as a 'social market economy'.

The first, central principle was that economic development was the best way to achieve social welfare. The structure of social services had to reflect this priority.

The principle is represented most clearly in the close relationship of services to people's position in the labour market. Social benefits are earnings-related, and those without work records may find they are not covered for important contingencies. Less clear, but probably even more important, is the general concern to ensure that public expenditure on welfare is directly compatible with the need for economic development and growth.

Second, the German economy, and the welfare system, developed through a corporatist structure. This principle was developed by Bismarck on the basis of existing mutual aid associations, and remained the basis for social protection subsequently.Both 'health' and 'social class' are artificial categories constructed to reflect social organisation.

natural and social selection. This would depend on the view that people who are fittest are most likely to succeed in society, and classes reflect this degree of selection.

The husband of an NHS worker who died of alcohol poisoning on the first day of their holiday has warned Britons to be careful when drinking abroad.. Devastated Stuart Bishop issued the stark. This essay is a discussion of how Social Policy had an impact to the National Health Service (NHS); the essay will pace the discussion in the context of some of the economic, political and social concepts that influence the development of social policy in the NHS.

This page introduces comparative social policy. It discusses the welfare state in Britain, France, Sweden, Germany, the United States, the European Union and developing countries.

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It is part of 'An Introduction to Social Policy'. Thatcherism describes the conviction, economic, social and political style of the British Conservative Party politician Margaret Thatcher, who was leader of her party from to It has also been used to describe the principles of the British government under Thatcher as Prime Minister from to and beyond into the governments of John Major, Tony Blair and David Cameron.

Thatcherism describes the conviction, economic, social and political style of the British Conservative Party politician Margaret Thatcher, who .

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